THE RED MARL AT BAGLIO SORÌA

The Catarratto Grape Harvest in Firriato’s Microcosm

Baglio Sorìa Estate enshrines a complex microcosm that faithfully represents the Firriato philosophy. The 90 hectares of vineyard with both indigenous and international varieties, the olive grove that characterizss the Mediterranean landscape and a 17th-century baglio (a fortified farm) that welcomes wine tourists from all over the world are the natural representation of a wine producer who brings the soul of Sicily to over 60 countries worldwide. Yet this is only what is shown on the surface because, going deeper, you will find that the terroir of this beautiful farming estate has itself a composite core. Red marlstone characterises this area, with the typical colour of the soil in between rows. This clayish layer slowly releases moisture during the hottest summer days, enabling grapes to better resist drought.

CATARRATTO, PRINCE OF SICILY

Traditionally, the white grape par excellence in Sicilian vine-growing

Nurtured by these clay soils, Catarratto enjoys ideal conditions for its perfect growth, as the root of the grapevine has the opportunity to sink deeper and deeper. In this way the delicate balance of every plant is protected from the summer heat by the moisture that this soil preserves naturally. Quite simply, it is the ideal habitat for a vine variety so representative of Sicilian viticulture. The manual harvest of these grapes lasted for several days under the bright light of the August sun. The hot days that characterised the harvesting period caused the harvest of Catarratto to take place a few days earlier than last year.

VITICULTURE IN WEST SICILY

From the Countryside to the Seaside, a Farming Environment that Rewards Men and Nature

Vines, olive trees and wheat are the pride of this corner of Sicily most suited to agriculture. Generations and generations of men and women have gone by, living on this land and off this land. In western Sicily farmers have preserved the landscape, they have protected and defended without exceptions. Today you can enjoy this pristine area thanks to the dedication of those who loved the places of their lives. Catarratto, along with other traditional grape varieties, is an integral part of this landscape. Many centuries of harvesting of Cataratto came before this one that has just ended in August at Baglio Sorìa. The year 2015 adds itself, as a small piece, to the thousand-year old history of Sicilian vine-growing.